Where to eat: Mimi’s Hummus

My best bite of hummus hails from a dimly lit side alleyway in downtown Amman, Jordan.  In the event you are unable to make the 12 hour flight for an overnight food feast through the streets of Amman, Mimi’s Hummus in Brooklyn serves some of the most delicious hummus I’ve uncovered around New York.  My Israeli best friend will certainly be angry at me for this statement but my mom and I were simply in awe of the unparalleled creaminess of the simple Mediterranean staple.

I’ve only been there for brunch, but I imagine everything on the menu is delightful at any time of day.  Here’s what you need to order:

– Green Shakshuka (Braised swiss chard, tomato, sunny side eggs & Bulgarian cheese – NOT your ordinary feta).  It comes with a little side Israeli salad (diced tomatoes, cucumbers, red onions)

– Hummus topped with mushroom and onion cumin stew served with warm, pillowy pita bread

– Mimi’s sandwich ( the house signature – open faced pita with lebane eggplant, roasted peppers and Bulgarian cheese)

The one issue I have with this restaurant is the remoteness of the Flatbush location, so if you are coming from Manhattan rent a Zipcar and drive.  The nearest subway is about a 10-15 minute walk.  And while I adore the quaint, homey feel of the restaurant, the 20 available seats fill up quickly so if you are planning to dine for brunch, I recommend arriving when the doors open.

Mimi’s Hummus

1209 Cortelyou Rd

Brooklyn, NY 11218

Weekend Brunch:  11am – 4pm

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Vino series: Wine regions of France

Another day, another wine tasting with my good friends at Chelsea Wine Vault.  Today we ventured through the various wine regions of the world’s largest wine producer.

Here’s a list of the delicious exploration from the marvelous growers hailing from Champagne to Bordeaux to Burgundy.

1.  Jean Michel Blanc de Meunier Champagne 2007 (Champagne):  $54.99:  Made with 100% Pinot Meunier, this special grape to the region is also known as the “other red grape”.  And while most of the champagne produced today is “non-vintage”, meaning blended product of grapes from multiple vintages, this favorable year led the producer to create a “vintage” wine, where the bottle is composed of at least 85% of the grapes from vintage year.

2.  La Foret des Dames Sancerre 2012 (Loire Valley):  $18.99:  While this wine was one of the most reasonably priced of the group and received a sweet 90 point mark from Cellar Tracker I was, unfortunately, not a fan.  Many say that Sancerre is where the Sauvignon Blanc reaches its zenith of quality but I was catching more lime fruit and melon on the nose and palate that didn’t appeal to my liking.  Fun new fact I learned about sauvignon blanc – most producers favor the grape because it is a simple process where you can plant and produce a sauv blanc in a year, while a pinot noir generally takes 4-5 years.

3.  Albert Boxler Gewurztraminer 2011 (Alsace):  $39.99:  Once again, I’m not sold on the German-influenced Alsatian wine that all seem to taste like sweet dessert wines to me.  Steve tells us this is one of his favorites in the group.

4.  Château Coussin La Croix du Prieur Rosé Côtes de Provence 2012  (Provence):  $16.99:  Spring has sprung, which means I’m partial to a refreshing rosé, and this 87 point winner from Wine Spectator has a smooth texture and acidity.

5.  Domaine Pierre Gelin Gevrey-Chambertin Clos De Meixvelle 2010 (Burgundy):  $54.99:  The rare, remarkable 2010 vintage year with small supply and growing worldwide demand drives the pricey tag on this beautifully balanced pinot noir.  Aside from that, the producers are crazy conscious of the need to respect the growing environment.  The Domaine uses rain water to wash its tractors and has installed a “plant container” to process water used to rinse sulfating equipment.  That’s what I call dedication!

6.  J.L. Chave Offerus Saint-Joseph 2011 (Rhone Valley):  $35.99:  I’m a fan of the big, bold, earthy reds which makes this Syrah more up my alley.  Suggested pairing with lamb chops.

7.  Château Haut-Segottes Saint-Emilion Grand Cru 2006 (Bordeaux):  $38.99:  Definitely give this wine some time to open up its aromatics and flavor.   Notes of smoked cherries, cigar, peppercorn with an earthy texture.

See you at Pinot Palooza!